How to know if I see the game the way other people see it (literally)?

#1

I’ve been playing OrbusVR for a few days. Every time I play I can’t help but wonder if the quality of the graphics that I am seeing are really what they’re intended to be.

When I see videos like https://youtu.be/jubKVueA9PA on my computer the graphics are sharp (ignoring the low poly art of OrbusVR). However, when I play OrbusVR on my Oculus Quest, everything is rather blurry. I have to really focus my eyes and center on objects to be able to see them clearly and to be able to read text, and it is hard to distinguish icons above mobs. It is even difficult to recognize mobs at all when they’re a little far away.

I noticed that I have to set my lens setting on the Quest to the extreme left. Not sure what this means, but since it is an extreme I am wondering if perhaps my eyes are simply not compatible with a VR headset (I do not need glasses but I did laser my eyes a few years ago). Without expecting a conclusive answer to this question here, is there at least a way for me to visually record exactly what I am seeing? When I record a video in the quest, the quality of course looks just like the youtube videos (sharp). Is there a way to capture the “real” VR-like visuals that I am seeing?

#2

the oculus quest is a mobile device and the game on it looks like it’s set below the lowest graphics possible on PC, definitely. But it sounds like you’re describing a different issue than that. Also reading the text is crap at a distance on any headset in my experience, so that part might just be the in-game reality.

The setting on your quest is called IPD (is meant to match the space between your eyes to give the most clarity) there was a little calibration phase when you first started it right? So wherever it’s clearest should work. There are cellphone apps to measure IPD and see if yours is a value that’s abnormal or not.

give this a watch to get your head around the IPD stuff:

#3

I’ll add this too:

the oculus quest does a thing called fixed foveated rendering, meaning the ‘center’ looks sharp while the edges are intentionally blurry to use less horse power to draw (all VR headsets have a similar effect just due to the lenses being sharpest in the center, but the quest is way more so). This means if you’re looking side to side with your eyes you’ll see all sorts of aweful. VR requires sort of training yourself to look straight ahead and turn your head instead. That could be an issue.

1 Like
#4

Thanks Frank. IPD is 72.0mm (measured with iPhone X); so how do I know what my Quest is set to?

Edit: found my IPD setting by browsing to http://quest-ipd.glitch.me/ on the oculus browser in VR. Then set it to exactly 72. Will try again once OrbusVR updated.